Sunday, November 28, 2010

Crying at the Movies

River recently wrote about easily she cries of late. I recall crying as a kid when I watched Lassie Come Home. I never saw Bambi, but I expect I would have cried had I seen it. I cried at my grandfather's funeral when I was 17 because I was worried who would look after my grandmother, but otherwise I don't recall crying much at movies or tv.

Whatever you may think of ex Prime Minister Bob Hawke, he kind of made it ok for men to cry after he cried when talking about his daughter's drug addiction and again after the appalling Tiananmen Square slaughter of its own citizens by the Chinese government.

After that, the next time I can recall crying was when I saw a production of Madame Butterfly on tv.

I did cry at Dame M's wake. But that was alcohol related and a friend set me off when she started bawling. Actually, that was an occasion when I did not just tear up, but had a full on sobbing session with our friend.

But now, even just watching the news on tv I tear up at sad events. I have been accused of being hard hearted, non caring, insular. I don't think I am. I expect my job has a lot to do with the way I come across, or I may be thought of. I have to be hard hearted at work. My work has shaped my personality in a way I don't particularly like.

I am glad that Australian men have moved on to the point where they can cry. There is no shame in it. I used to be embarrassed if I cried. Now, I just don't care. If I cry and it is a problem for someone it is their problem, not mine.

10 comments:

  1. Crying is good for the soul.

    But I cannot stand "The Little Aussie Weeper" blerch.

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  2. A few months back my son's male teacher was talking to me about TJ's "comfortableness to express his emotions" but rushed to assure me that it was a good thing and I have to tell you that hearing a male teacher say that it's okay for boys to cry is a damn good thing I thought. You can see the shift in our culture drifting it's way down.

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  3. Hawkie Jayne? No, I dun like him either.

    MB, love the teacher speak. It really shouldn't be an issue. Then I remember what is like being a kid, and you need to be tough to survive teenage years.

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  4. No sure about Hawkie ... I think it started as a technique ... now both he and his tears should be put out to pasture ... quit at the top of yer game Hawkie ... about 15 year ago, mate!!

    But ... crying ... I agree ... their problem if they have issues with it ... nowt to do with you ...

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  5. At the movies as a kid, 'Old Yella' and 'Shane' got me going.

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  6. I think I saw or perhaps read Old Yella. Never seen Shane, but I believe it is one of the best.

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  7. It's worth taking a look, if for no other reason than to see Jack Palance's portrayal as the definitive black hatted (and black gloved, in this case) 'baddy'.

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  8. Julie, if see that America Cup tv clip of 'your boss is a bum'once more, I will scream.

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  9. I cry at everything slightly emotional on the telly. It's ridiculous. Lucky for me I live by myself and no one is around to see my shameful behaviour!!

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  10. LS, I hope balanced by a goodie in a white hat.

    It's your party Fen. You can cry if you want to.

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