Thursday, February 04, 2010

German Weight

I was walking along a laneway and there was a large box with German writing on it. I can't read German and so I don't know what was in the box, but the weight of the box and its contents grabbed my attention. It said 14,6 kgs. I missed the comma and thought it was a full stop. Can't be I thought, the box alone would be heavier than 14.6 kg. I looked closer and realised it was 14,6 kg. There was another lower weight too, gross and tare weights I suppose.

So it would be 146 kg. Why insert a comma? Is this a standard German practice?

9 comments:

  1. Germans use commas in the same way that we use decimal places. So if you see something for 20,00 euro, it's $20.00. I think a few other Euro countries do the same, I know Macedonia does.

    ReplyDelete
  2. And they also use full stops where we would use commas so 20.000.000,00 would be 20 million point (or decimal) zero zero.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Most European countries follow the same system as the Germans. I used to work for a Danish multinational, and it caused all sorts of confusion when communicating with my colleagues overseas. You can check which countries use which system here.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Odd that...it's usually the French who like to be awkward.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Well, you get ed-ya-ma-kated in the more oddest of places! lol

    ReplyDelete
  6. Ok Fen. I still don't get why there needs to be any mark when using hundreds.

    Didn't know that Belle, thanks.

    Very confusing Altissima. Why can't these matters be standardised?

    DA and Brian. They aren't alone. Confusion reigns.

    Jayne, glad you said oddest places and not oddest people.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Interesting. It is often the Americans who divert from common practices; eg mm/dd/yy rather than the more common elsewhere dd/mm/yy.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Victor, I just wish Americans knew how hard they make it for the rest of the world with that one.

    ReplyDelete