Thursday, September 03, 2009

Balcony Decoration

There is not a lot of decoration on our balcony. Only the hardiest of plants survive the extreme temperatures and the buffeting winds. This cyclamen was bought as indoor flowers for a week and it survived and I tried it on the balcony and it has done very well in cold and windy weather. As soon as the weather warms up, I expect it will finish.


This plant has travelled with us for quite some years. It is almost indestructible although cockatoos had a good go at it a couple of years ago. I have forgotten the name. It has sharp spikes on the woody stems, so care needs to be taken. I have a feeling that our friend in Japan may have originally given it to us. We gave it our Fijian Indian friend when we moved here, but then decided we could accommodate, so it came back. It is not at its best in winter. It adores the heat and hot sun, flowers prolifically and doesn't need much water.


Speaking of friend in Japan, these gorgeous little wombats are a couple of critters I refused to give up when we moved from the house. They sit on the return of the balcony where people step to admire the sea views. Eyes to the horizon, never mind what is on the ground, so they are minus some limbs as they have been kicked many times. Freezing cold, boiling hot, they never complain, just continue to peer into the lounge room. I loves 'em.

14 comments:

  1. Isn't there a joke about legless wombats?

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  2. I kill all flowers and most plants. Not through malice but through incompetence and neglect.

    My high rise is a flowers and mostly plant free zone.

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  3. "Isn't there a joke about legless wombats?"

    Not sure, but I do recollect hearing one about wombless legbats.

    But I had had quite a few drinks at the time so it might well have been about a wombat, a bilby and a numbat walking into a bar with an Englishman, an American and an Australian.

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  4. I think your very hardy plant may be a Jade Plant (also known as Lucky Money Plant). I had one about 50sm high, but it got some sort of infestation or virus that caused ugly black pin-spots all over the leaves. Didn't seem to harm the plant, but it looked awful so it had to go.

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  5. If there is Scott, I don't know it. See below.

    And LS, all three are critters I like.

    Of course it is Altissima. I knew that. Just testing. Friends have a really big one in a half barrel. It is stunning. Ours never really grows.

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  6. Victor Victor. Style. It is the salt spray coming in from the harbour that kills your plants.

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  7. You'll get away with the concrete wombats unless you've given them cute names. Well??

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  8. Anonymous11:57 pm

    Yes, yes, it was me who gave you the plant!!!! Vik.

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  9. My daughter's flat has the same weather conditions as yours...she tries so hard for herbs and a few windblown plants struggle to live - but she perseveres...whereas here everything grows like in a horror movie

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  10. just today i saw a 6ft version of your prickly plant on my walks around Brunswick.

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  11. Just for your benefit Jahteh, Tee and Ampy.

    Cheers Vik. What about the band aids to go with it when the spikes get me?

    MC, we do get a bit of shelter from the wind. Depends which direction of course. Petunias are ok in summer.

    They can be pretty spectacular when they are large Fenz.

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  12. Anonymous7:04 pm

    Ah yes, sorry, that was thoughtless of me. But never fear - the remedy is on the way!! Vik.

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  13. Clearly postage of my birthday present won't cost much this year.

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  14. Anonymous10:53 pm

    Oh so that wasn't a hint for your birthday????? Vik.

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