Wednesday, May 27, 2009

Came Across a Beauty

As we were leaving South Melbourne Market last Sunday, R noticed this car and drew my attention to its magnificence. There was not a speck of dust on this EH Holden Special, from 1963 or 1964.

The EH had the first of what was called the 'red' motors, which superseded the old 'grey' motor. They were very reliable, although the brakes, steering and gearshift were very ordinary. You just so would not want to drive it heavy traffic and to be changing gears all the time. An automatic transmission was available, the Hydramatic, but it was very very slow and slowed the car down considerably as it slurred between its four forward gears.

The EH was available in two engine sizes, 149 cubic inches and 179 and the larger would move the car from 0 to 60mph in a bit over ten seconds, respectable by today's standards.

Note the grommet looking objects in the centre door pillar. Looks like the seat belts have been replaced too.

18 comments:

  1. Wow, it's in great nick, I once had the earlier model, a 62 EJ hydromatic 149. I loved driving it tho it was a bottomless pit for money.

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  2. They weren't manufactured with seatbelts, side mirrors either, both are modern additions

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  3. Phwoar, pardon my drool, that's gorgeous!
    Pity about that grommet on the pillar,seatbelts were optional back then, maybe they had to install them from scratch?
    The ex dropped a refurbished V8 red motor into our Dunnydore(Commodore) when the black motor shat itself and it wasn't too shabby performance-wise.

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  4. Ahh, Ian confirmed my comment, ta.

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  5. Jesus, you don't see them like that very often, especially not out in the wild like that! She's certainly a tidy unit, and I'm sure like all early Holdens there is a story to go with it.

    Hydramatics were a three-speed trans though weren't they? The first locally built Holden with a four speed was the VL Jatco unit I always thought.

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  6. We too had an EJ when I was a kid Ian. We thought we were the poshest people in the world when it was bought. Seat belt anchorage points were built in, but the belts an accessory. External mirrors also an accessory.

    The grommets indicate to me Jayne, that the belts have been replaced, as per comment to Ian, to fit them originally would not require drilling holes in the body. Re Commode, motor probably left the body behind.

    Well Mutant, you sure know how to get me to do some research. I actually thought they were two speed. There is much confusion it would seem. Here are three bits of writing I have found. I've narrowed it down to less than five and more than one.

    It gives you the extra flexibility and smoothness of 3 speeds. It has a Special Intermediate ratio to provide extra pulling power on hills or controlled engine braking on long descents.

    Transmission:
    3 spd. man 2 spd. hydramatic

    The Hydra-Matic was modified in the EH and had four stages or ratios, with the first speed having two stages.

    Has that cleared it all up?

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  7. Yup, and I was the child that had to jump out of the car, lift the hood, click over the gears manually..all because it got stuck between gears on the column shift, lol..still, I loved that car we had :)

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  8. Excellent corporation colours.

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  9. It is really pretty, and I love that it's been taken care of.

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  10. 3 on the tree and the steering wheel lock that slid down the gear stick ;)

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  11. Gosh, I had forgotten that Cazzie. Yes, they did lock up.

    What sort of corporation Brian?

    Daisy, pretty as a picture, like you ma chere.

    Like a sleeve Jayne? I never experienced them.

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  12. Any corporation that can't be bothered buying colourful paint, Andrew...which usually means all of them. The colour scheme reminds me in particular of those cars they used to make for disabled people on benefits in Blighty...three wheeled jobbies, which, in less politically correct times, we all called 'spaz chariots'.

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  13. Reading through some of your recent posts, it seems we frequent the same parts of Melbourne. We're probably walking right by each other every few days!

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  14. Brian, it is an usual colour to be seen now, but I like its freshness. I think we saw one of those three wheelers in a village. The centre of gravity did not look right to me. Do they tip over easily?

    Pretty likely we have Evol, although I would guess less than every few days.

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  15. I had that exact tye of car...sob it was my first car and I paid for it with a tax refund of $348 in 1977 - it was 2nd hand of course...it went like a dream till Don drove it home one night plastered (he was young) and didn't realise the radiator was EMPTY...it was never the same car after that...sold it for a second hand Valiant circa about 1962 model...I remember that dashboard...

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  16. Heaters weren't standard either, deluxe additions perhaps. I got one from EH world in Sydney's Punchbowl and installed it to keep my driving toes warm!

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  17. Ours only had air flow heater. I think the ones with a fan had a third lever under the other two chrome levers. The Premier had a centre console with a large fan switch built into that.

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  18. MC, those old Valiants were rippers. I thought they were great.

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