Sunday, February 08, 2009

We Was Wrong

What a weekend. What a terrible weekend. Friday night R said, 'Looks like it will be bad tomorrow'.

'Wait for the anti climax,' replied moi.

I really wish I correctly predicted the day, but alas, I did not.

I called ABI Brother who lives on the outskirts of Pakenham to make sure he was watching for flying embers.

Later I called Mother, who had been in somewhat of a panic, but was ok when I spoke to her. She has some very kind friends who like to assist a helpless widow. I suspect at least one has designs on her.

For the half the night I listened in horror to the marvellous coverage by ABC Local Radio. They even flew in broadcaster Tim Cox from Tasmania to take a turn at the mike. Noticeably absent from the team was Red Symons, though some fronted up for multiple shifts including producers. Of course they will get paid, but they don't have to do it.

Who I did not consider was Sister and Little Jo, who was with the Bone Doctor in the hospital provided unit in a large central Victorian town. Behind the unit is a large paddock covered by dry grass, at least slashed. A fire came within one kilometre and Sister had the car packed, which she had only just unpacked the night before, ready to head to the centre of town. Fortunately the wind direction was good for Sister, albeit not for others.

Poor Little Jo hated being cooped up in the unit all day with sporadic air con as the power went off and back on. She could not understand why there was no outing at all for the day. She would not sleep in the afternoon, but finally did at six o'clock. At nine, the Bone Doctor and her boss rang them to come and join them for pizza at the bosses palatial house. They were offered an overnight stay, but as the Boss already had a fire refugee guest, they declined. Priority for today was a visit to the local pool for a swim for Little Jo. She just loves a swim.

Of course I can't not have a go at someone in a post. So a brick bat to all the stupid people who clog up telephone lines and websites with their pathetic minor concerns and offers of $2 or a smelly old blanket or half a bale of hay. Worse they call 000 (999 or 911 or 112), to ask stupid questions. What part of emergency don't people get?

Emergency broadcaster! Emergency services! Emergency telephone! Look it up in a dictionary.

14 comments:

  1. Do hope you're coping ok Andrew.

    I did put up a news story link to temporarily distract you. A friend of mine dashed over to Kings Cross Railway Station yesterday, and saw that new Steam Train arrive into London. They said there was about 2,000 people packed onto the platform.

    Oh was surprised about the Agapanthus. They can normally withstand anything. I've seen them grow wild on The Isles Of Scilly.

    Cheers.

    David.

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  2. The snow doesn't seem so bad on reflection.

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  3. Glad to hear you and yours are ok, Andrew.
    Tis truly "a horror movie on the 6.30 news" this week.

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  4. Thank goodness for Little Jo, your sis and sis in law! I did think of your mum also.
    Yes, it upsets me immensely the stupidity of people calling 000. Gah!
    I have been thankful my pop was ok up in Bendigo, the fire was like 1 km away from him. My aunt's property and cousin's prepertys have been left unscathed. This does not mean that they are far from clear..so much undergrowth and the grass and trees are so dry!

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  5. Kings Cross Station David. Came in from the north. I will follow it up, thanks.

    Although Brian, more die from cold in UK than die from heat or fire here.

    I can't even imagine what some people have gone through Jayne.

    Same area Cazz? Prouses Road.

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  6. What about me! I've had to change my post about 5 times now! The number of people I told on Saturday morning that I thought John Brumby was 'being a bit dramatic'.. feel like an idiot now let me tell you.

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  7. Well Jen, at least you didn't put a figure on the toll, like so many have, which sadly becomes redundant all too soon.

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  8. It's a sad day for all Victorians.

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  9. I can't take in how terrifying it must have been for victims and others caught up in the firestorms.

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  10. Anonymous8:43 pm

    I've been reading about the fires online - it's terrible! I rang Dad tonight because he lives in Cockatoo and the Dept. of Environ... website said more fires had broken out today in the Dandenongs area. Cockatoo is ok at the moment but Dad said he's ready to leave if need be.

    Glad to hear your family is ok too. Vik.

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  11. For sure Reuben.

    The last moments of those who died plays on my mind Victor.

    This time Cockatoo is ok Vik, but it will happen there again at some point. Meanwhile, Melbourne as a city functioned pretty normally today. Human lives are the most important, but animal stories are already coming out and there will be many of them in the future. Already seen pics of dead 'roos.

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  12. Anonymous12:19 am

    Yes, there are probably hundreds if not thousands of wild animals and livestock that have perished in these fires. Like you, I feel for the people who died or were burned but I also feel for the loss of animal life. It's a tragedy for all living things - even trees. Vik.

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  13. Thank goodness all your family are safe Andrew. I worry about my family in the north-east but they are ok and ready to leave if needs be. They wouldn't let me come up and look after the place the weekend before, on my own, because they were worried about the fire conditions. But no-one could have imagined this in our worst nightmares.

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  14. Thanks LiD. Aside from Sister being a bit close, I don't actually know anyone affected. Re your parents, wise. Really not a time to travel needlessly. Looks like things will be ok this weekend at least.

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.