Sunday, February 22, 2009

A long comment

Worth a blog post on its own merits. I suppose Anon did strike a defensive nerve.

A comment on a post was

Yes your just mean. Typical of a whole demographic of privledged selfish inner city types.

You have been lucky in life. I hope for your sake you never fall on hard times.

My reply

Mean I may be Anon, but it does not negate the point that Australia is a rich country and our taxes should pay for assistance for all social problems. Not that I have any spare cash, I do live in a property worth a considerable sum. When I am gone, half will go to young rels probably and the other to an animal charity. Animals don't whine and whinge and if they possibly can, will seek out their own shelter and food.

Yes, I am lucky, if you can call doing the same shit job for three decades to pay for the little I have.

I am lucky because I sacrificed to the max in the early eighties to buy a run down hovel in East Malvern. Doing the same job now, I could never afford a house in East Malvern, begging, borrowing and lying to get the money together, a whole $42,000, without knowing I could really repay the monies. This troubles me, as does the whole buying property thing for young people now.

To conclude, the government and our taxes should look after people and they ought not have to depend on charity. Charity for the poor is a terribly old fashioned view. Donations should be for the little extras in life, such as sports, opera and arty theatre.

12 comments:

  1. "Animals don't whine and whinge..."

    My cat does if he isn't fed on time.

    Totally agree with you on the charity philosophy though, Andrew. Red Nose Day is coming up over here in Blighty and if anyone of those nappy-wearing, unhumorous gits waving a bucket of coins about comes near me he'll get a kick in the gnadgers. In this day and age there shouldn't be the need for charities, and it's tossers like that voting Tory/New Labour etc to keep their taxes down who've created the problem in the first place.

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  2. That is it Andrew, "Stick it to da man!" (said with South African accent!

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  3. and that commenter is typical of a society that judges people without knowing the facts. I really loathe people who do that. It's ignorant and lazy.

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  4. I'm not going to mention the poor grammar - it's you're, not your.

    Whoops. Just did anyway.

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  5. My view also Brian. Note that California with its low taxes is near to broke. Good one Arnie.

    I was going to let it go Cazzie, but I was in the mood, so to speak.

    Quite so Fenz. No doubt I come across in a certain way in this blog, parts of it would be correct, other parts way off the mark.

    The grammatical error did eliminate one suspect MD.

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  6. 'Privileged inner city types' is just a spectacular Ad Hominem attack; spectacular for its meaningless and its irrelevance.

    I wish people would be more rational and less judgmental. I'm looking at you, Senator Fielding.

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  7. What I want to know, is how anon saw your post in the first place. If they were a regular reader, then I really don't think they would have judged so harshly. Makes me wonder if it was someone who may have been trapsing the bloggisphere, just waiting for someone to say something they could lash out at...
    With that said, I think it's great that you can stand up for what you believe in, and at the end of the day - it's your blog, you can say whatever you bloody well want!

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  8. Deb, you are probably correct about Anon. And indeed I can say what I want, but I do kind of try to keep others in mind. It was more fun when I could write and I had no readers to offend.

    I don't like Anon commenters who don't use a nick. I never know if might be the same Anon who I have known previously from comments.

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  9. Reuben, inner city types come in all shapes and sizes as does anyone in any area. I may quickly stereotype people by where they live, but I know ultimately, it is no judgment of them.

    Saw Fielding recently on the floor of the Parliament. What a prat. But he is quite a good speaker on tv and radio. Practice your speaking Reuben. The future of Little Jo depends on people like you. I am old. Don't worry about me.

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  10. Awwwwww...

    Feel free to impart any age-induced wisdom.

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  11. Anonymous1:47 am

    The comment wasn't from me Andrew. I am in same boat as you funnily enough. 30years working in same place - hocked my self in 80's to buy first home in inner suburbs of Syd. 11 years later sold and upgraded to larger home. We weren't given bloody first home owners grants or baby bonuses. We were on struggle street for years and with the 18% interest rates back then too. But looking back it was all worthwhile. Saved for everything we did not live on handouts. Bloody ungrateful little upstarts these days.

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  12. No wisdom Reuben, just experience.

    I knew it wasn't you SydAnon. How would people go with 18% now? T'was hard, but not impossible. Suppose we should be grateful for good health etc etc.

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.