Tuesday, August 12, 2008

Tap, tap, tap

I wasn't surprised that keyboards were slightly differently arranged in Singapore. I was very surprised that English keyboards are arranged differently, and not in an insignificant way.

What I had great trouble with was that the @ symbol was not where we are used to it being. Now if you have been used to hitting the @ symbol above the 2 going back to the days of huge Remington typewriters, like forty odd years, you can guess that I made a lot of use of the backspace key correcting. I think the @ was about where our full colon is.

I also forget where the £ symbol was, but I expect the differences come from the need to have a £ symbol. I suppose there was a € for Euro on the keyboard too, which we don't have.

Fortunately the qwerty part was the same.

5 comments:

  1. Came across an old typewriter in an op shop the other week and FB asked,
    "How do you correct spelling mistakes?"

    Short answer -
    Don't make any to correct! :P

    ReplyDelete
  2. I used to go back and type x over the mistakes in the days before liquid paper and correction tapes. I will make a post about typewriters.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "I think the @ was about where our full colon is."

    It's nowhere near my colon, Andrew. But then again I don't blame it. It's above the apostrophe.

    "I also forget where the £ symbol was..."

    As far as the government's concerned, heading down the slippery slopes into hell. As far as the standard British keyboard's concerned, above the '3'.

    "I suppose there was a € for Euro on the keyboard too, which we don't have."

    Unlikely, 'cos we don't bother with euros either.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I just knew as I typed colon Brian..... Above 3 is where our hash symbol is. Europe will win eventually.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Never. They've tried it on with us Brits on numerous occasions, and they've never won yet. Well, apart from all the foreign inbreds in our aristocratic lineage, of course...

    ReplyDelete

Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.