Tuesday, April 15, 2008

I scent the odour of a rodent

It was only the Indian overseas students in Melbourne who got a bit bolshie and protested about their second rate educational institutions. Chinese students said nothing and they have been victims for much longer.

Hopelessly stereotyping, but Chinese are much less likely to publicly protest about anything.

Yet Chinese in Australia were out on the streets at the weekend protesting about the protests against the protest disruptions of the Olympic Torch Rely because of China's mistreatment of protesting Tibetans. (That was a lot of protesting).

Spokespersons are saying that they are disappointed with Australian's for being so anti Chinese. They, as Chinese people, feel that Australia is discriminating against the Chinese.

How did it get to this? Who said we hate Chinese? Some of us may not agree with the Chinese government's treatment of Tibetans or China's policies in Tibet, but where did the anti Chinese citzen thing come from.

There must be a very big hand behind this.

Gawd, I hope it is not so simple as Chinese who live in or are staying Australia get brownie points back home for marching in Australia in support of China, or calling up radio station talk back lines and breaking into tears with their emotional distress with all this supposed anti Chinese feeling in Australia.

Blah, do you think we are stupid?

15 comments:

  1. In the key of Monty Python, altogether now: "I like Chinese, I like Chinese, They only come up to your knees, But they're wise and they're witty and they're eager to please...I like Chinese thoughts, The wisdom Confusious taught, Think of the many things they've done to impress, Like Maoism, Taoism, I-Ching and chess...Oh I like Chinese, I like Chinese, I like their tiny little trees...etc."

    There...that should cheer 'em up.

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  2. Good point, Andrew. Pro-govt protests? I wouldn't mind if it wasn't so bloody obvious. Like the many student protests in Indonesia.

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  3. I'm gonna get a call from the Chinese Ambassador on my white slim line telephone Brian.

    Wonder why is it not being mentioned in the media Lad?

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  4. I got confused over all the protesting.

    Brian, you forgot the food - it's fabulous.

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  5. Which are Chinese and which are Tibetans Daisy Jo? Me too at times.

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  6. Anonymous1:49 pm

    Yes its all a bit suspicious, especially all the bursting into tears by female Chinese student "protesters". I have been at several of the pro Tibet independence protests and the tears there were much more genuine, and the anguish palpable.
    As to the "hate Chinese" thing even at the pro Tibet protests I have not heard anyone talk against the Chinese people, protests have been directed against Chinese government actions in Tibet, not the Chinese people

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  7. Pretty much how I see it Anon.

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  8. PR crap, intent on disrupting our peaceful city.

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  9. Daisyjo,

    You're quite right. Ahem...(adopts Eric Idle's voice): "I like Chinese food, The Waiters never are rude..."

    Can't remember the rest of it now. I'll have to dig out my old Python collection and stick a plug back on the record player.

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  10. All PR Jayne, but I did see the torch in 2000 was it? Quite exciting.

    Stop you cross Atlantic flirting Brian.

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  11. Where's Captain Xiao to serenade us with his absurdity? When can we expect the "Evil Racist Tibetans" to be discussed?

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  12. I think...we just want our Olympics. Without the boycotts flying in from all directions (as vicious attacks on the people? No idea...) Then after that, you can talk about the government all you like and most of us won't give a rat's.

    The bursting into tears thing...most Chinese wouldn't cry or show much emotion in public (I don't know about these new lads from the mainland) so for someone to be crying in public is a big, fat, patriotic deal. -_-

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  13. I just set the scene lads. Go for it.

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  14. I did think it was a bit strange to see people walking down Swanston Street holding Chinese flags on Sunday. I didn't see any tears though. Interestingly it was occurring at the same time as a protest against the war in Darfur( actually I think it was vigil for the refugees) on the steps of Flinders Street station.

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  15. Mixing up protests without clear signage is confusing Ben. Groups need to identify themselves better.

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