Tuesday, April 08, 2008

The British Luxfer


The British gave us some marvellous things, such as

Railways through Africa
Dams across the Nile
Fleets of ocean greyhounds
Majestic, self-amortizing canals
Plantations of ripening tea
(got it right this time Rosanna)

I expect they also invented this device for allowing almost natural light to below ground areas in buildings. I am convinced that the British Luxfer must have been superior to any other model. Sadly this one near my workplace has had its glass removed and filled with concrete, but I know there are some intact ones in the city. But I wonder if they are the British Luxfer. When only the best will do.

13 comments:

  1. Ah...the old underground toilet skylight. We've got plenty of them round here. When I was a kid I used to spend hours standing at urinals looking up waiting for girls in short skirts to walk across 'em. If I tried that nowadays, of course, I'd get probably arrested...again.

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  2. Learnin something new everyday I am.. never knew about these things. Now I shall be on the lookout for them when in the city.
    I once was asked to look out fr those old toilet enclosures of wrought iron...I found them and captured images of them, do you remember that? Well, it made me start to look at the city and take in everything I go past. I often wonder about some of the architecture about the place.

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  3. I forgot about those 'thingamys'. You remind that they were common in Sydney in my young days (decades ago). I wonder whether any remain in Sydney?

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  4. Except you couldn't really see through the glass Brian.

    I do receall your pissoir discoveries Cazzie. I think there are some of these underground skylights in Russell Street. I will check them out.

    I bet there are still some Victor.

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  5. There's those and another brand - can't remember name- floating about the city streets.
    Collins st used to have a motza of them.
    Underground dunnys are now Heritage Listed in Melb...at least we can legitimately p!ss on this museum piece :P

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  6. Andrew,

    Like most frosted glass, the view is only obscured to a certain depth. The imagination of a creative child fills in the rest.

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  7. Haha... i bet that one in Aus gets more light through that the glass filled ones in England!

    I'm only reaffirming your suggestion that I'm over England aren't I?

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  8. I guessed there would be other brands Jayne. I will take a pic in the city.

    Yes Brian. I am so old, I forgot about imagination.

    Well, you have plans Jiminy. It isn't a life sentence.

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  9. I love how you point out these things Andrew. I have seen these skylights but I have never given them much thought. You remind me to stay intrigued with my surroundings.

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  10. They pose a health hazard though. What if a particularly heavy person jumped up and down on it?

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  11. All in the detail eh LiD.

    They are too strong Reuben. They are like small glass bricks set into the frame. And if a heavy person did jump on them, they deserve to go through. Many have been deliberately damaged.

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  12. Very good, so true Andrew.

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  13. Nice point there, Andrew. Consequential punishment courtesy of gravity!

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.