Friday, March 07, 2008

Flooded Train


The train appears to be proceeding through the deep water with quite a lot of extra steam. I have sat on this photo for a while because I wanted to check that the hotel is still there but I so rarely go to that part of Chapel Street. I believe the hotel is still there and the location is Chapel Street near what is now the Jam Factory but it could be where the train goes under Toorak Road. Quite a crowd has gathered, which indicates it could be stalled. The date with the photo is January 1907

R tells me as a kid in the UK, he used to stand on a bridge over a railway line and disappear into steam (and probably soot too) as the Flying Scotsman went through his town.

Photo courtesy Public Record Office of Victoria.

15 comments:

  1. What an unbelievable photo! Thank you for that. I have saved it and will look at it some more.

    I saw the Flying Scotsman when it came out to Australia some years back.

    Love trains............

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  2. Back again....

    my fella says it must be moving 'cos of the bow wave (his boating terminology).

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  3. Of course it is or was moving Bliss. Further looking, I now think it has just hit the water and is about to stop. Surely it wouldn't be driven through the water at such speed.

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  4. Anonymous8:22 pm

    How exhilarating it would have been to be on that train!

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  5. Anon, if you were a kid I suspect it would be exhilarating but I think an adult might be somewhat alert alarmed.

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  6. Amazing, isn't it? Ten foot of water and this antiquated engine still manages to plough on regardless. Nowadays, with all the improvements in trains and stuff, they hit one lousy leaf and the entire network grinds to a halt.

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  7. Or in our case, stopped by some caterpillars on the tracks.

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  8. They'd have stopped the train for caterpillars on the line in Britain too. Can't have the garnish from the buffet car escaping like that.

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  9. What a photo Andrew. Those machines are made of stern stuff. Still ploughing it through water is freaky. I would definitely be alarmed if I had to go aquatic with that engine.

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  10. I love this pic, have seen it somewhere before(prob in one of the tonnes of books floating around here).
    You can imagine the driver building up the steam and letting it rip to plough through the water..and no doubt all the kids cheering madly lol.

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  11. Anonymous1:33 pm

    Hi Andrew - I did a bit of hunting for you and found another version of the picture that identifies the hotel as the Imperial on Chapel St (near the Jam Factory) and was taken on 25/1/1907.

    Here is the link:
    http://museumvictoria.com.au/railways/image.aspx?ID=779

    and the hotel:
    http://www.imperialsouthyarra.com/

    Cheers, Walker

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  12. Hey LiD and Jayne, you really got it. Isn't it a brill pic.

    Thanks heaps Walker. It is a better picture of the train and you confirmed the location. Now what I want to know is how did cable trams travel over such a flimsy looking bridge?

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  13. watching trains from bridges is fascinating whether they are floodbound or whether you are a kid or not ... I can never understand why there is a constant wail to cover over the fabulous Flinders Street rail lines.

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  14. What an awesome image Andrew, it says more than a thousand words..what an exciting time watching the train go through there it would have been :)

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  15. You are such a nerd too Bwca. Fancy getting pleasure from watching trains in the Jolimont yards. I guess you remember when people used to walk from the train in the Jolimont yards to Flinders Street when the train stopped in the yards.


    T'is a magic pic Cazzie. Extra thanks to the Public Records Office and Museums who put these pictures online.

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Whenever I wish I was young again, I am sobered by memories of algebra.