Wednesday, September 12, 2007

Help blind person

No, should be a comma there, Help, blind person. No, still wrong. Help please blind person. If you are reading this blind person, (Andrew hesitates over his choice of words) can you help with an answer.

I have in front of my a sheet of stiff paper with the Braille alphabet on it. It also has punctuation and numbers on it.

For you who don't know, Braille is all a matter of raised dots that are a possible combination of six dots, arranged vertically two across, three up and down.

There is a 'try your skill' sentence or two, and I quickly learnt that you guess the word after getting the first two letters or so. Usually correctly as you have a context.

This bit I don't understand and probably I am missing something and I might understand by the time I finish writing this.

When an arrangement of dots is placed before a to j, the letters become numbers from one to nine. So say for 10, we have the number symbol, then the 'a' symbol denoting one and then the 'j' symbol denoting zero. Clear. But what if you want say 98. Number symbol 'i' and 'h'.

How do you know that the 'h' is still part of the number and not the first letter of the next word.

And yes, I have worked it out. There will be a space between the end of the number and the next word I guess. Just as there are in sentences show below on the example given.

I should just delete this post to cover my lack of cleverness, but it may be interesting to some who don't know anything about Braille.

5 comments:

  1. "But what if you want say 98."

    Well you'd deduct two digits and say "Joe Hasham!"

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  2. You wouldn't believe me if I said I have no idea what you are talking about M'lord.

    For a gay teen, he wasn't a bad role model. ie Not all are effem fairies, not that there is anything wrong with that.

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  3. C'mon Shirl do the math (as the septics say). 98-2= Boom, boom!

    Mind you even though he also wasn't a fairy would you have contemplated Jimmy Edwards as a role model? ... more your roly-poly model. Boom, boom #2

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  4. I did get it M'lord. I didn't know about Jimmy Edwards though.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This ought to have given a clue. :0)

    "Bottoms Up!", 1959, film acting role as Professor Jim Edwards.

    ReplyDelete