Thursday, May 24, 2007

Divide if you can

I blithely made a comment on Ben's blog that yes, my writing is bad, but I do know how to do long division. Ummm, that is until I tried to do it and I actually forget how to do it. It has been a long long time. I am sure I could work it out given time, but I can't be bothered. It did not come to my mind instantly. I have forgotten how to do long division. The sky is falling.

I bet the American education system is superior. Come on Daisy Jo. Can you long divide?

11 comments:

  1. I don't like to brag, but yes, I can. Long division is like riding a bike: wobbly if you haven't done it for a while. You haven't forgotten, you're just wobbly!

    As for the American system (from my recent experience with volunteering at the after-school center) I've found that the kiddies on the affluent side of town can long divide, but kids from the wrong side of the tracks aren't so fortunate...very sad, in my opinion.

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  2. Like riding a bike, if you practice it long enought it will return to mind soon enough. If I did not know my maths I would be in dire straits work wise for sure.

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  3. Shite...I just read Daisy's comment above..and I hope she doesn't think I copied her, it is more like a "snap" moment, LOL. Amazing..perhaps like minds?

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  4. Snap is right. I tried to do long division last week and was completely stumped.

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  5. Daisy Jo and Cazzie. I can do it on my phone. We don't need to know it now. For me it is an old curiosity.

    Jahteh, there were two types. There was an above line one for easy numbers but a a below one for harder numbers. I tried again today and failed. It was a long time ago and we grew up with calculators hey. Aren't we so modern!

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  6. I just looked up long division on wikipedia, it is just as complicated as I remember, but think I could do it now. Thinking back, I've never had to use it since grade 6 in any of my maths classes at secondary school, TAFE or uni, probably because of calculators.

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  7. Ok Ben, I am going to have a serious go at this when I get time.

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  8. First you bring up the calculator in Windows...

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  9. ... then you loosely cast on 92 stitches. Place 46 stitches on each needle and join to begin working in the round, being careful not to twist. The first and second needles of the round are designated Needle 1 and Needle 2, respectively. Work 10 rounds in Corrugated Rib. Knit one, purl one, knit two together then cast off.

    ... giving you the answer, πr²

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  10. Hey, just because I CAN doesn't mean I do!!

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  11. Quite so Cincy, except I have forgotten how to do that too.

    I know all about pye r squared....well, I used to, but alas knowlege of the Tigris and Euprates has proved more useful in later life.

    I don't even know if it is still taught here Daisy Jo.

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